Geoff

  • swinger started the topic Hello Gentlemen in the forum Group logo of Mens RoomMens Room 3 years, 7 months ago

    Hello Guys! Let’s get this forum going.

    What do you think makes being a male different in a swinging relationship?

  • I think it’s a great idea!

  • ThumbnailCuckold historically referred to a husband with an adulterous wife and is still often used with this meaning. In evolutionary biology, the term cuckold is also applied to males who are unwittingly investing […]

  • Arabia
    Wife-lending was a practice in pre-Islamic Arabia whereby husbands allowed their wives to live with “men of distinction” to produce noble offspring. The husband, who abstained while his wife lived with the […]

  • It may not be possible to trace a precise history of swinging since the modern concept is so closely related to basic human sexuality and relationships, and they vary significantly across time and cultures. The […]

  • Many couples enter swinging while in secure relationships, providing added motivation to avoid excessive health risks. Though some sexual affairs outside relationships may be in “the heat of the moment” without […]

  • Swingers are exposed to the same types of risks as people who engage in casual sex, with the main concerns being the risk of pregnancy and of contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Some swingers engage in unprotected sex, a practice known as barebacking, while others follow safe sex practices and will not engage with others who do not also practice safe sex. Swingers may reduce the risk of STI by exchanging STI test results and serosorting. Proponents of swinging argue that safe sex is accepted within the swinging community and the risk of sexual disease is the same for them as for the general population — and that some populations of sexually non-monogamous people have clearly lower rates of STIs than the general population. Opponents are also concerned about the risk of pregnancy and STIs such as HIV, arguing that even protected sex is risky given that some STIs may be spread regardless of the use of condoms, such as Herpes and HPV.

    A Dutch study that compared the medical records of self-reported swingers to that of the general population found that STI prevalence was highest in young people, homosexual men, and swingers.  However, this study has been criticized as not being representative of swinger populations as a whole: its data was formulated solely on patients receiving treatment at an STI clinic. In addition, according to the conclusions of the report, the STI rates of swingers were in fact nearly identical to those of non-swinging straight couples, and concluded that the safest demographic for STI infection were female prostitutes. According to the Dutch study, “the combined rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea were just over 10% among straight people, 14% among gay men, just under 5% in female prostitutes, and 10.4% among swingers.”

  • Some people object to swinging on moral or philosophical grounds. Most religious communities and moralists regard swinging as adultery, notwithstanding that it is with the knowledge, consent or encouragement of one spouse to the other. Some argue that strict monogamy is the ideal form for marital relationships and that sexual relations should only take place between marriage partners or, perhaps, between partners in a committed monogamous relationship.

  • According to 2005 estimates by the Kinsey Institute and others, swingers account for two to four percent of married couples with numbers in excess of 4 million people in North America. As of 2011, some experts believe that there are as many as 15 million Americans swinging on a regular basis.
    Research on swinging has been conducted in the United States since the late 1960s. One 2000 study, based on an Internet questionnaire addressed to visitors of swinger-related sites, found swingers are happier in their relationships than the norm.

    60% said that swinging improved their relationship; 1.7% said swinging made their relationship less happy. Approximately 50% of those who rated their relationship “very happy” before becoming swingers maintained their relationship had become happier. 90% of those with less happy relationships said swinging improved them.
    Almost 70% of swingers claimed no problem with jealousy; approximately 25% admitted “I have difficulty controlling jealousy when swinging” as “somewhat true”, while 6% said this was “yes, very much” true. Swingers rate themselves happier (“very happy”: 59% of swingers compared to 32% of non-swingers) and their lives more “exciting” (76% of swingers compared to 54% of non-swingers) than non-swingers, by significantly large margins. There was no significant difference between responses of men and women, although more males (70%) than females completed the survey. This study, which only polled self-identified swingers, is of limited use to a broader application to the rest of society (external validity) owing to self-selected sampling.
    John Stossel produced an investigative news report into the swinging lifestyle. Stossel reported in 2005 that more than four million people were swingers, according to estimates by the Kinsey Institute and other researchers. He also cited Terry Gould‘s research, which concluded that “couples swing in order to not cheat on their partners.” When Stossel asked swinging couples whether they worry their spouse will “find they like someone else better,” one male replied, “People in the swinging community swing for a reason. They don’t swing to go out and find a new wife;” a woman asserted, “It makes women more confident – that they are the ones in charge.” Stossel interviewed 12 marriage counselors. According to Stossel, “not one of them said don’t do it,” though some said “getting sexual thrills outside of marriage can threaten a marriage”. Nevertheless, swingers whom Stossel interviewed claimed “their marriages are stronger because they don’t have affairs and they don’t lie to each other.”
    According to economic studies on swinging, the information and communications technology revolution, together with improvements in medicine, has been effective in reducing some of the costs of swinging and hence in increasing the number of swingers. And the economic approaches which seem best suited to capture the empirical data are those based on the concept of hedonic adaptation. These approaches suggest that it is consistent with maximizing swingers’ strategy to begin from “soft” swinging and only later engage in “harder” swinging, and that also the search for ever new sexual experiences delays long-period hedonistic adaptation and hence increases swingers’ long-period well being. Both these theoretical predictions seem to find confirmation in the empirical data on swinger behavior.

  • Swinging can take place in a number of contexts, ranging from spontaneous sexual activity involving partner swapping at an informal gathering of friends to planned regular social meetings to “hooking up” with like-minded people at a sex club (also known as a swinger club, not to be confused with a strip club). Different clubs offer varied facilities and atmospheres, and often hold “theme” nights.

    Swinging is also known to take place in semi-public venues such as hotels, resorts, or cruise ships, or often in private homes.  Furthermore, many websites that cater to swinging couples now exist, some boasting hundreds of thousands of members.

  • People may choose a swinging lifestyle for a variety of reasons. Many cite the increased quality, quantity and frequency of sex. Some people may engage in swinging to add variety into their otherwise conventional sex lives or due to their curiosity. Some couples see swinging as a healthy outlet and means to strengthen their relationship. Others regard such activities as merely a social and recreational interaction with others.

  • Swinging, also known as wife swapping or partner swapping is a non-monogamous behavior, in which partners in a committed relationship engage in sexual activities with others as a recreational or social activity.
    The phenomenon of swinging, or at least its wider discussion and practice, is regarded by some as arising from the freer attitudes to sexual activity after the sexual revolution of the 1960s, the invention and availability of the contraceptive pill and the emergence of treatments for many of the sexually transmitted diseases that were known at that time.
    The swinger community sometimes refers to itself as “the lifestyle”, or as “the alternative lifestyle”. The term “wife swapping” or “partner swapping” is criticized for not accurately describing the full range of sexual activities in which both singles or couples may engage, which is not limited to conventional sex with a person other than their regular sex partner. Other terms sometimes encountered are wife sharing,partner sharing, wife trading and wife lending, which describe similar concepts, usually in sociological or anthropological research.

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